The most creative vehicles America has ever made

Cadillac's 1912 territory introduced a significant leap forward: an electric starter.

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Cadillac’s 1912 range

Presented in 1934, the Airflow broke all binds with DeSoto's past models thanks to a aerodynamic design portrayed by smooth lines and headlights coordinated into the front end

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DeSoto Airflow (1934)

William Stout (1880-1956) merits recognition for making one of the world's most memorable minivans and one of the most advanced vehicles made accessible to general society during the 1930s.

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Stout Scarab (1935)

Imagined as a passage level Duesenberg, the 810 was allocated to the Cord brand when leaders embraced front-wheel drive to make it lower.

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Cord 810/812 (1936)

In July 1941, Willys tied down a rewarding agreement to furnish the American military with a light-obligation utility vehicle that could permit officers to explore war zones all over the planet should the public authority choose to enter World War II.

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Willys Jeep (1941)

Tucker almost entered the pantheon of auto history as perhaps of the most creative carmaker in America.

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Tucker 48 (1948)

Nash merits an honor for development in light of the fact that its Metropolitan shown that drivers didn't have to drive in that frame of mind of a vehicle.

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Nash Metropolitan (1953)

More than sixty years after its presentation, the Corvair stays perhaps of Chevrolet's most disputable nameplate. At send off, it was commended as perhaps of its generally creative model.

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Chevrolet Corvair (1959)

Oldsmobile's mission to carry execution to the majority drove it to explore different avenues regarding constrained enlistment.

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Oldsmobile Jetfire (1962)

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